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Richmond University Medical Center
Chemical Dependence Crisis Center
75 Vanderbilt Avenue, Building 1-4th Floor,
Staten Island, NY10304
(718) 818-5766
www.rumcsi.org

Intake Phone Numbers:
(718) 818-6132, (800) 422-8798

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Assistance: Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

At Richmond University Medical Center, we serve our community with high-quality inpatient and outpatient services. Internationally recognized specialists direct our reproductive medicine center, and we operate a high-risk pregnancy center for women requiring special care. In addition, our Level III Perinatal Center includes a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with one of the highest survival rates in the city.
Our Emergency Department is a Level I Trauma Center, led by board-certified Emergency Department physicians. Our hospital has 510 acute care beds and is a New York State-designated Stroke Center. RUMC also has a:
Sleep Disorders Center
Wound Care Center
Pain Management Center
Our physicians include leaders in vascular surgery, pediatric gastroenterology, ophthalmology, urology, oncology and cardiology.
RUMC has partnered with Mount Sinai Medical Center to bring the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program Clinical Center to the Island, just across the street from the hospital. We are proud to be able to bring this program close to home for Staten Island 9/11 responders.
We look forward to serving your health needs.
RUMC Silberstein Clinic Med Sup OP
427 Forest Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10301
(718) 876-2362
www.rumcsi.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Detoxification, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, Italian, Russian, Spanish

At Richmond University Medical Center, we serve our community with high-quality inpatient and outpatient services. Internationally recognized specialists direct our reproductive medicine center, and we operate a high-risk pregnancy center for women requiring special care. In addition, our Level III Perinatal Center includes a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with one of the highest survival rates in the city.
Our Emergency Department is a Level I Trauma Center, led by board-certified Emergency Department physicians. Our hospital has 510 acute care beds and is a New York State-designated Stroke Center. RUMC also has a:

Sleep Disorders Center
Wound Care Center
Pain Management Center
Our physicians include leaders in vascular surgery, pediatric gastroenterology, ophthalmology, urology, oncology and cardiology.
RUMC has partnered with Mount Sinai Medical Center to bring the World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program Clinical Center to the Island, just across the street from the hospital. We are proud to be able to bring this program close to home for Staten Island 9/11 responders.
We look forward to serving your health needs.
Camelot of Staten Island Inc
Outpatient Adult Program
263 Port Richmond Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10302
(718) 981-8117
www.camelotcounseling.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents

Camelot provides counseling services for adults, adolescents, children, and families who’s lives have been affected by drug or alcohol use.
We help clients explore the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that led them to substance use and abuse.
Camelot has programs throughout New York City’s five boroughs.
Camelot of Staten Island Inc
Drug Free Residential
273 Heberton Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10302
(718) 816-6589
www.camelotcounseling.com

Intake Phone Numbers:
(718) 816-6589x21, (718) 981-8117

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Criminal justice clients

Camelot provides counseling services for adults, adolescents, children, and families who’s lives have been affected by drug or alcohol use.
We help clients explore the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that led them to substance use and abuse.
Camelot has programs throughout New York City’s five boroughs.
Camelot of Staten Island Inc
CD Outpatient Prog 2 Intensive Outpt
263 Port Richmond Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10302
(718) 981-8117
www.camelotcounseling.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Spanish

Camelot provides counseling services for adults, adolescents, children, and families who’s lives have been affected by drug or alcohol use.
We help clients explore the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that led them to substance use and abuse.
Camelot has programs throughout New York City’s five boroughs.
Proceed Inc
Addiction Services
1126 Dickinson Street,
Elizabeth, NJ7201
(908) 351-7727
www.proceedinc.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors), Payment assistance (Check with facility for details)

Languages: Portuguese, Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, DUI/DWI offenders

On November 12, 1970, Ines Caneda, Luis Matos, Carlos Leon, Philip Garcia, and Jose Rodriguez signed the incorporation papers for the Puerto Rican Organization for Community Education and Economic Development—better known now as PROCEED, Inc. It was originally staffed by fewer than five people working in three rented offices on Broad Street in Elizabeth, New Jersey. A small nonprofit corporation, PROCEED had modest goals: to establish an orientation center, carry out educational activities, and promote the general welfare of Puerto Ricans in the Elizabeth area.

Puerto Ricans had been building vibrant neighborhoods and contributing richly to the Elizabeth’s infrastructure for decades. However, the economic recession of the late 1960’s and early 1970’s caused job loss, financial burden, and racial tensions. One of the effects was a reversal of migration patterns: for the first time since the 1950’s, there were more Puerto Ricans leaving the U.S. than there were immigrating.

The many Puerto Ricans who chose to stay not only experienced the fragmentation of their communities, but were also faced with a lack of information and services due to language, social, and cultural barriers. PROCEED, Inc. was created to address these barriers and to give Puerto Ricans a medium through which they could keep the Puerto Rican community in Elizabeth flourishing.

Over the past 40 years, the City of Elizabeth has continued to evolve, and PROCEED has grown alongside it. As new communities seeking social services have emerged, PROCEED has grown to adapt to these communities’ unique needs. By amplifying the breadth of its services to reach all community members, not just Puerto Ricans, PROCEED has established itself as a comprehensive, premier service institution in the Union County Area.

PROCEED now serves all that seek and qualify for services, regardless of race, nationality, ethnicity, religion, disability, or sexual orientation. It has expanded its programs, which range from preschool centers to a transitional home for men living with HIV/AIDS and counseling programs for those struggling with abuse and addiction. It has also taken the lessons it has learned locally and embarked on a national endeavor—to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate capacity building services to other organizations around the country and in the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the USA Virgin Islands.

As PROCEED has continued to flourish as a service provider, it has repeatedly outgrown its many homes, from the offices above the Amigo Chicken on Elizabeth Avenue to the preschool on Second Street. In 2000, PROCEED began the much-needed project of buying its first home, and, in 2001, it officially began offering services from its very own, bright orange headquarters on Dickinson Street. In 2009, PROCEED bought and opened its sleek second building on East Grant Street in response to the agency’s continuous and healthy growth. Once comprised of just a few hard workers in rented office space, PROCEED is now made up of over a hundred hard workers, two newly renovated buildings of its own, a thirteen-bedroom transitional house, and offices in the City of Plainfield.

While there have been physical and programmatic changes for the organization, what has not changed in the past 40 years is PROCEED’s unfaltering commitment to helping those who need it most and to doing so with integrity, passion, and optimism. We care deeply about personal relationships, about community building, and about empowering people to become leaders and self-starters. The consumer whether an individual, a family, or another organization is always the main priority. To this end, PROCEED works to help the individual as a whole rather than simply fix his or her isolated problems, and it does so by continuing its tradition of empathetic care and individualized attention.

Over the past 40 years, PROCEED has welcomed tens of thousands of individuals to its many homes and offered each of them access to extensive, personalized services and to a reliable network of community partners. PROCEED’s consistent and effective presence in the community has allowed it to endure, not only as an active and progressive non-profit organization, but also as a neighborhood landmark and as a witness to the change, development, and tradition of the greater Elizabeth and Union County area.
Bridge Back to Life Center Inc
1688 Victory Boulevard,
Staten Island, NY10314
(718) 447-5700
www.bridgebacktolife.com

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, State financed insurance (other than Medicaid), Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Languages: Spanish

Specializing in Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Gays and Lesbians, Seniors/older adults, Women, Men, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients

Since 1988, Bridge Back to Life has achieved a reputation for quality treatment of addictive disorders. We offer day and evening hours six days per week. Our Masters and Doctoral level therapists provide quality care in most treatment modalities, including group, individual, and family psychotherapies. All patients receive a comprehensive evaluation prior to beginning treatment. This evaluation culminates into an individualized treatment plan for each person. This may include crisis intervention services, psychiatric evaluation, medication management, intensive outpatient programs, and a variety of other colateral services. In addition, our centers pride themselves on being culturally sensitive. We currently offer treatment services in several languages including Spanish, Russian, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Polish.
Staten Island University Hospital
Chemical Dependency Rehab Unit
375 Seguine Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10309
(718) 226-2260
www.siuh.edu

Intake Phone Numbers:
(718) 226-2800

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Hospital inpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Specializing in Women, Men

Staten Island University Hospital is a 714-bed, specialized teaching hospital located in New York City's 5th and fastest-growing borough. Occupying two large campuses, plus a number of community-based health centers and labs, the hospital provides quality care to the people of Staten Island, the New York metropolitan region, and to patients from around the world.

The 17-acre north campus (475 Seaview Avenue, Ocean Breeze) features the architecturally beautiful six-story Tower Pavilion; home of the renowned Heart Institute of Staten Island. The Heart Institute rivals the best cardiac centers in the nation, and offers advanced cardiothoracic surgeries, including "continuous beating heart" surgery plus sophisticated invasive and non-invasive diagnostics.

The north campus also is home to the prestigious Nalitt Institute for Cancer and Blood-Related Diseases, which was New York State's very first freestanding ambulatory cancer care facility, and remains an innovator with leading-edge research protocols and a compassionate, caring ethic. Other vital north site locales include the multi-specialty Irving R. Boody, Jr. Medical Arts Pavilion, the hospital's Regional Burn Center with its deserved national reputation for pediatric burn care, plus a Trauma Center, Center for Women's Health, and widely-acclaimed programs for high-risk pregnancies and maternal care.

The south campus (375 Seguine Avenue, Princes Bay) offers specialty programs that include Geriatric Psychiatry, the hospital's accredited Institute for Sleep Medicine, and a range of behavioral health and substance abuse services. Both campuses have 911-receiving Emergency Departments, and Staten Island's fully-modern, new Emergency Department and Education Center is currently under construction at the north site.

Founded in 1861, Staten Island University Hospital today is a member of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and enjoys numerous academic and clinical affiliations and accreditations.
Staten Island University Hospital
Alcoholism Outpatient Clinic
392 Seguine Avenue,
Staten Island, NY10309
(718) 226-2752
www.siuh.edu

Intake Phone Numbers:
(718) 226-2800, (718) 226-2801

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment, Buprenorphine Services

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare, Private health insurance, Military insurance (e.g., VA,TRICARE)

Payment Assistance: Sliding fee scale (fee is based on income and other factors)

Languages: ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Specializing in Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, DUI/DWI offenders

Staten Island University Hospital is a 714-bed, specialized teaching hospital located in New York City's 5th and fastest-growing borough. Occupying two large campuses, plus a number of community-based health centers and labs, the hospital provides quality care to the people of Staten Island, the New York metropolitan region, and to patients from around the world.

The 17-acre north campus (475 Seaview Avenue, Ocean Breeze) features the architecturally beautiful six-story Tower Pavilion; home of the renowned Heart Institute of Staten Island. The Heart Institute rivals the best cardiac centers in the nation, and offers advanced cardiothoracic surgeries, including "continuous beating heart" surgery plus sophisticated invasive and non-invasive diagnostics.

The north campus also is home to the prestigious Nalitt Institute for Cancer and Blood-Related Diseases, which was New York State's very first freestanding ambulatory cancer care facility, and remains an innovator with leading-edge research protocols and a compassionate, caring ethic. Other vital north site locales include the multi-specialty Irving R. Boody, Jr. Medical Arts Pavilion, the hospital's Regional Burn Center with its deserved national reputation for pediatric burn care, plus a Trauma Center, Center for Women's Health, and widely-acclaimed programs for high-risk pregnancies and maternal care.

The south campus (375 Seguine Avenue, Princes Bay) offers specialty programs that include Geriatric Psychiatry, the hospital's accredited Institute for Sleep Medicine, and a range of behavioral health and substance abuse services. Both campuses have 911-receiving Emergency Departments, and Staten Island's fully-modern, new Emergency Department and Education Center is currently under construction at the north site.

Founded in 1861, Staten Island University Hospital today is a member of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and enjoys numerous academic and clinical affiliations and accreditations.
Saint Vincents Services Inc
Outpatient Chemical Dependence Program
148 Bay Street, 2nd Floor,
Staten Island, NY10301
(718) 981-7861
www.svs.org

Services Offered: Substance abuse treatment

Residency: Outpatient

Payment Accepted: Self payment, Medicaid, Medicare

Specializing in Women, Men

SVS was founded in 1869 as a home for young working boys. Originally called St. Vincent’s Home of the City of Brooklyn for the Care and Instruction of Poor and Friendless Boys, it quickly became known as “the Newsboys’ Home.” Its original location was 10 Vine Street, a building very near the Brooklyn waterfront.
At that time, there were multitudes of children in New York City who either had no family or whose families were too poor to care for them. In addition, there were large numbers of immigrant children arriving at Ellis Island whose families ended up in similar straits, rendering them homeless and obliged to fend for themselves. These destitute children found work, sustenance, and shelter wherever they could; however, working conditions were terrible, and many of the children were forced to sleep outside on rooftops, in abandoned lots, or on the stoops of buildings.
It was at this time that a number of religious groups stepped in, thus becoming pioneers in the field of providing “childcare” to those in need. In 1865 the Reverend Francis J. Freel, a member of the Brooklyn St. Vincent de Paul Society, proposed a project “to provide shelter for homeless boys who slept out of doors without benefit of education or religion.”
Bishop Laughlin and others in the clergy heartily supported this effort, and the St. Vincent’s Home opened on November 4, 1869, with 20 boys. The Society bore the financial burden for running the Home. Boys were not turned away if they couldn’t pay. In its early days, St. Vincent’s, the first Catholic working-boys’ “home” in America, provided housing for boys from 7-16 years of age.
Early on, the founding Board of Directors formed separate committees to deal with building repairs and how to raise money two issues that continue to be important for the well-being of SVS today.
By the end of the 1800s, it became apparent that St. Vincent’s would need to find larger accommodations in order to house its growing population of young boys. After several attempts to find an existing space that would be suitable proved unsuccessful, the Board determined that purchasing land and building a new home on it was the most prudent course. In 1904 a plot of land at the corner of Boerum Place and State Street in downtown Brooklyn was purchased from a retired carriage maker, and a six-story building was erected. In June 1906 the new building was dedicated.
By 1915 the average number of boys living in the Home was 170. With its increased space, the Home started to accept younger boys who did not work. The Dominican Sisters who now lived at St. Vincent’s cared for the boys; for the next 65 years (until 1971) they took care of the boys’ domestic arrangements, provided them with education and instruction in life skills, and worked to make the Home a welcoming environment. The number of boys continued to increase; by 1921, the average number living in the Home was 250.
As the country sank into the Depression in the 1930s, it was determined that because so many of the boys could not find work, those over 18 could remain in the Home free of charge. During the World War II years, the boys started attending local schools in the surrounding Brooklyn neighborhood as it was felt that attending school with others from the community would help them to become better adjusted to society.
In the 1950s, a majority of the boys at St. Vincent’s attended school, as opposed to working full-time. The mid-century years also saw a considerable increase in the professional staff at the Home. Onsite staff now included a bandmaster, athletic coaches, arts and crafts teachers, and dance instructors, as well as educators and tutors. Sports activities abounded; at one point St. Vincent’s hosted three football, five basketball, and four ping pong teams, along with intramural hockey, softball, dodgeball, and volleyball. Group recreational activities included scouts, theater and opera parties, and boat rides, as well as monthly dances.
The 1960s saw a move toward more individualized and personalized services for the boys in St. Vincent’s care. In 1965 the agency opened its first group home in Springfield Gardens, Queens, followed by a second one in Bayside and a third in Corona in 1967. Also in 1967 a program was designed to accept foster children-even though at its inception there were no foster parents as such in the community. A vigorous effort to recruit and license potential families was begun. The effort proved highly successful; within a few months a number of foster homes were licensed, some of which would go on to permanently adopt the child or children placed with them. Over the years, the support of a vital and active Foster Parent Association served to facilitate the goal of permanency for our children, whether a return to the child’s natural family or an adoption. In 1967 a licensed Guidance Clinic was established to offer psychological support for the boys at St. Vincent’s; in 1977 this facility expanded to become our Outpatient Mental Health Clinic.
In March 1968 the Reverend Robert M. Harris was appointed the Director of St. Vincent’s. (Father Harris would become Monsignor Harris in 1984.) As a former assistant director of the Catholic Youth Organization of the Diocese of Brooklyn and Queens, he had the opportunity to see what motivated young people and inspired them to learn and grow. His diverse educational background included an undergraduate degree in philosophy along with graduate degrees in religious education, social work, and the philosophy of sociology. This broad exposure to different modes of thinking made Father Harris well suited to take the helm of an agency in transition and to bring many different viewpoints and methodologies to bear in addressing the challenges faced by young people in our increasingly complex society. Some of the questions asked by Father Harris upon coming to St. Vincent’s were: What services does this population of young people need? What types of educational support will help our children achieve academic success? How can we best meet the psychosocial needs of the children who now seek our services? How should mental health services be provided in order to best help young people deal with the issues to arise from life in the foster system? How can we ensure that every child who comes to St. Vincent’s learns the skills needed to achieve self-sufficiency as an adult? During this period, St. Vincent’s Guidance Clinic became one of the most important vehicles for addressing the needs of the young boys housed at the agency. The Clinic maintained a full staff of psychiatrists, psychologists, and trained social work and child care professionals who worked as a team to help the boys negotiate the complex system of family, school, and community.
The next several decades saw continued change and growth at St. Vincent’s. As new problems became apparent in society, St. Vincent’s responded by broadening its services.
The 1975 Willowbrook Consent Decree mandated that Willowbrook’s mentally ill and disabled patients be released to their communities for placement. In response, St. Vincent’s opened the first of three apartments for some of Willowbrook’s developmentally disabled children in 1980.
As the agency shifted toward a focus on foster care for both boys and girls, in 1982 the decision was made to formally close 66 Boerum Place as a home for boys. Each of the boys currently living at the Home was placed with a loving foster family, and the Boerum Place facility was fully renovated so that it could serve as administrative headquarters for the various departments that would be necessary to ensure the smooth functioning of St. Vincent’s growing operations. By 1986 St. Vincent’s was providing services for over 1,000 boys and girls in foster and group home care along with their families (birth, foster, and adoptive). An Aftercare program offered continued counseling and support for older adolescents (18 and over) who had aged out of foster care but still needed assistance in transitioning to adulthood.
Another extremely pressing social issue in the 1980s was the AIDS epidemic. Because children born with the virus acquired it from parents who were often too sick to care for them, they needed especially skilled foster parents who were capable of dealing with the multiple demands of caring for a medically fragile child. In response to this formidable challenge, St. Vincent’s Services established its Positive Caring Services (PCS) program in 1988. The PCS program has expanded over the years to accommodate infants and youth who are dealing with HIV/AIDS and other medically fragile conditions, including Spina Bifida, brittle bone syndrome, cerebral palsy, and autism. The PCS Program has developed specific assistance for our families to increase their ability to cope with the conditions affecting the children in their care. St. Vincent’s Medical Treatment Center (which houses the PCS Program) operates a full service pediatric and adolescent clinic with specialties in neurology and pediatric and infectious diseases, providing comprehensive medical care to children and adolescents. The Center also provides training programs for foster and adoptive parents on how to deal with the often-complex medical needs of their children. For example, many caregivers are required to perform specialized treatments such as tube feeding, suctioning, and chest physiotherapy, and must be able to identify subtle changes in their children’s health, which could signal the need for more extensive care. Our training services enable parents to perform a majority of these treatments at home, thereby enhancing the health and comfort of their children and allowing them to avoid lengthy and repeat hospitalizations. The PCS program currently oversees the treatment of approximately 73 children who must cope with medically fragile conditions, including 18 who are infected with HIV/AIDS. In the last twenty-one years, PCS has improved the lives of nearly 10,000 children and adolescents, as well as their families and caregivers.
Reflecting our commitment to education for young people as the route toward independence in adulthood, in 1997 SVS launched our signature educational initiative-the American Dream Program-to ensure that when our youth leave us, they do so with marketable skills that will enable them to secure meaningful employment and compete in today’s competitive global economy. ADP fulfills this ambitious goal by providing tuition assistance and room and board, as well as support for tutoring, counseling, health care, and other incidental expenses through graduation from an institution of postsecondary learning-even past age 21, when all government aid ceases. Through ADP we provide the types of support needed by our young people-many of whom are facing considerable challenges from life in the foster care system-in order to attain long-term academic accomplishment. Funded entirely through private donations, the ADP ensures that all young people who are accepted into a program of higher education (including college, technology or trade programs, vocational training, etc.) will be able to attend their chosen institution until they graduate. Since our young people overwhelmingly lack the supports and “safety nets” of a child who has grown up in a traditional family structure, it goes without saying that their goals of higher education and self-sufficiency would truly be little more than a dream without this crucial source of support.